Chicken Adobo

Adobo a popular dish in the Philippines. Not to be confused with Spanish adobo, the process involves meat, seafood, or vegetables marinated in vinegar, soy sauce, and garlic, which is browned in oil, and simmered in the marinade. It is the unofficial national dish of the Philippines. The cooking method is indigenous to Philippines. Early Filipinos cooked their food normally by roasting, steaming…

Beginner’s La Paz Batchoy

La Paz Batchoy is one of the definitive dishes from Iloilo, a province located in the Western Visayas region of the Philippines. Batchoy is believed to have been invented by Federico Guillergan Sr. in 1938 while working for a Chinese merchant. In 1945, he opened his first stall in La Paz Market and has continued to…

Dinuguan

Filipino cuisine is very confusing and the more anyone explores, the weirder it becomes. For example, Dinuguan is something we enjoy but can be very polarising to foreigners. It is a Filipino savory stew of pork offal (typically lungs, kidneys, intestines, ears, heart and snout) and/or meat simmered in a rich, spicy dark gravy of pig blood, garlic, chili (most often siling mahaba), and vinegar. (Margarita Marquis (2007). La Cuisine des…

Giniling

Giniling is literally translated as ground (meat). This dish is usually cooked with pork but my family prefers the use of beef. The dish itself has some similarities with Spain’s Arroz a la Cubana. Some people serve this dish with deep fried plaintains to balance the savory taste with something sweet. What you will need:…

Ginger Chicken

Ginger chicken is simple and one that my mother used to cook for me when she was still with me. It’s the local and soupier version of Hainanese chicken, and is often overlooked by Filipinos because it is not as famous as Chicken Adobo. I am not familiar if this is something cooked outside Pangasinan…